Pipeline

A pipeline full of preventative cures

The enormous unmet medical need represented by Lumen’s initial targets also demonstrates the size of its addressable markets.

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C. difficile Colitis

Product Candidate

C. difficile Colitis

(Clostridioides difficile)

Mode of action: Cocktail of biologics in two formats

Spring 2018

Completing in vivo efficacy studies

Traditionally considered a hospital-acquired infection, C. difficile is  increasingly arising in the broader community. For this reason, the shelf-stable, orally delivered format of Lumen’s product is an important addition to the tool kit for treating and preventing this disease. Long-term consequences can include chronic diarrhea, severe intestinal inflammation, surgical resection, and death. Insidiously, the very thing that is used to treat this infection—broad spectrum antibiotics—is also the thing that causes the disease. C. difficile therefore appears at the top of the CDC’s antimicrobial threats list year after year, and in 2009 was estimated to single-handedly drive 2.3% of all US hospital costs.

Covid

Product Candidate

Covid-19

SARS-CoV-2

Mode of action: Neutralizing antibody cocktail

2020

Lead optimization

Covid-19 is widely known as a respiratory disease, but its GI symptoms are well documented. The now-famous ACE2 receptor is abundantly expressed on the cells lining the GI tract, and over half of Covid-19 sufferers show symptoms of GI distress, and up to a quarter show only GI symptoms. GI infection by the virus can have serious long-term effects, and high enteric viral loads are thought to contribute to fatalities from acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) and wet-lung disease. Lumen’s Covid-19 product is designed to block GI infection and rapidly flush the virus from the GI tract, thereby reducing disease symptoms and potentially reducing transmission rates.

Traveler’s Diarrhea

Product Candidate

Traveler’s Diarrhea

(C. jejuni & E. coli)

Mode of action: Neutralizing antibody cocktail

Winter 2018

Phase 2

Supported in part by funding from the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation, Lumen’s traveler’s diarrhea product is a cocktail of neutralizing monoclonal antibody-like protein biologics designed to bind and neutralize the primary causes of traveler’s diarrhea:  the bacterial pathogens Campylobacter jejuni and enterotoxigenic E. coli. In addition to making life miserable for travelers and deployed servicemen and -women, they are a major cause of infant mortality and morbidity in the developing world. Lumen is committed to working with the Gates Foundation and other global health advocates to make these products available in the developing world, regardless of ability to pay.

Norovirus Enteritis

Product Candidate

Norovirus Enteritis

(Calciviridae norovirus)

Mode of action: Neutralizing antibody cocktail

Summer 2018

IND prep

Norovirus, also known as the winter vomiting bug or the “cruise ship virus,” is undersurveilled and probably the single most common cause of diarrheal illness in developed countries. In addition to famously making life miserable for cruise operators, the disease's burden on nursing home residents is underappreciated outside of specialist circles. The COVID-19 pandemic has spotlighted  the immense burden of infectious disease in American nursing homes, and norovirus has long been one of the most prevalent. There are currently no treatments or preventatives on the market for norovirus — the only treatments are time, patience and oral rehydration therapy. 

malaria

Product Candidate

Malaria

(Plasmodium spp.)

Mode of action: Recombinant active vaccine

2017

In vivo efficacy studies

Initially developed as a proof-of-concept demonstration of the platform’s capabilities, Lumen’s malaria program is now fully funded by the NIH. For reasons that remain unclear, many malaria vaccines suffer from only modest efficacy and relatively brief protection. Some require multiple shots over several months—a challenge due to the lack of the required cold-chain distribution infrastructure and trained medical personnel where malaria is endemic. Lumen’s shelf-stable, non-injected vaccine may therefore become an important complement to traditional intervention programs. This program is a collaboration with the Murphy Lab at the University of Washington, a leading center for malaria research in the US.

Our future target initiatives span a range of diseases.